The Gutter Film series brings “A Boy and his Dog” to The LAB Miami tonight. Don Johnson fighting the apocalypse and being awesome. Don’t miss it. 

The Gutter Film series brings “A Boy and his Dog” to The LAB Miami tonight. Don Johnson fighting the apocalypse and being awesome. Don’t miss it. 

Missed Innovate MIA? Check out this video recap done by the Knight Foundation! The LAB Miami was proud to be a part of such an exciting week for Miami. 

"Where others saw windowless concrete, Goldman saw canvas."
Wynwood featured on Huffington Post.

"Where others saw windowless concrete, Goldman saw canvas."

Wynwood featured on Huffington Post.

Take a quick trip back to Art Basel through the eyes of En Masse.   Really captures the energy that took over the neighborhood, still feeling the ripples of it…

We wish you happy holidays from the extended LABrat family!

We wish you happy holidays from the extended LABrat family!

We are now on Instagram! Follow us @thelabmiami We knew you weren’t getting enough LABness, so now you can get us with filters and all. Happy Apocalypse everyone.

We are now on Instagram! Follow us @thelabmiami We knew you weren’t getting enough LABness, so now you can get us with filters and all. Happy Apocalypse everyone.

17 startups gathered in our new space to perfect their pitches for the first Wayra Demo Day in Miami. Check out how these entrepreneurs from all over the world gathered here in Wynwood to collaborate and innovate together. 

Tonight! Joins us for some food on wheels and beer at our new home. 
400 NW 26th Street. 

Tonight! Joins us for some food on wheels and beer at our new home. 

400 NW 26th Street. 

"the ultimate goal is not only fostering a greater culture of innovation but also deepening resident engagement, creating a greater sense of purpose and possibility, and developing a much more strongly-felt attachment to our young and still rapidly-evolving city."  At The LAB Miami we share this goal and vision completely and are so excited to move forward together with the Knight Foundation. Our new partnership and home will allow us to further bring art and tech together under the same roof and provide both an innovative space and collaborative community for people in Miami to learn, act and build together. 

Read more about this exciting news here. 

Give Miami Day

Check out the Miami Foundation’s Give Miami Day  and see which local nonprofits are raising money online. If you want to make a donation to a local nonprofit with a notable cause, The LAB Miami has a few recommendations you can explore.  Wynwood’s very own O Cinema is  participating and even won the “Sleepwalker” incentive prize for $500. Experience Aviation is another great local organization participating in Give Miami Day. Experience Aviation is a nonprofit focused on strengthening young people’s skills in science, technology, engineering, by developing hands on projects for participants. You should also check out The Miami Rail, an independent editorial about art and culture. Give Miami Day has already raised $462,168 and will be accepting donations until midnight tonight, so don’t miss out on an opportunity to support your local nonprofits!

"Wifredo Fernandez’s The LAB Miami is helping recreate Miami’s Wynwood neighborhood as a hub of creative companies"
Read the full article at Upstart Business Journal! 

"Wifredo Fernandez’s The LAB Miami is helping recreate Miami’s Wynwood neighborhood as a hub of creative companies"

Read the full article at Upstart Business Journal! 


An interview with Lori D

Lori D is an artist and animator living in Portland, Oregon. Her beautiful work is part of our "Good for Nothing" exhibit that is opening tonight. The party starts at 7 and we can’t wait for all of you to see it. Fellow artist, Dillon Froelich asked her a few questions:

Whether it’s painting, commercial illustrations, or animations, each piece you produce has such a visible sense of humor. Do you find creating work that makes people smile important when working on a new series?

A lot of the time when I’m working I’m just sort of playing and exploring ideas and letting the narratives unfold so I think maybe the humor comes from posing questions for myself in the image(s) when I’m working and then coming up with little visual punchlines for my own amusement.  Hopefully the humor is legible by others too!

It is so exciting to see your world come to life through your animation projects. How do you like working on animation verses painting? Do you find zines being helpful in creating a storyboard for upcoming animations?

Thank you!  Painting is so much more immediate so I enjoy it for that reason and also because I get to play with color a lot more.  Animation takes a long time to bring to life usually so it is more of an ongoing commitment to an idea.  But there’s nothing quite like seeing your drawings come to life when you line them all up in a row.  I use zines more as a way to work with text or to share specific information, or a collection of ideas.  I like that you can put a handmade thing like a zine into a lot of hands and over a long period of time for a very low expense.  Zines are also interesting to work with because they too are time based in a way; in that it offers a little experience for the reader that isn’t over as fast as if they were just facing off with a painting.  They can hold a zine in their hands and keep it until they are ready to put it into the hands of somebody else.  That’s a special quality about zines.  They can have a long life and reach a lot of people.

Along with designing multiple skateboard graphics, you also write a monthly column in The Skateboard Mag. Where do you think your style fits within the skateboarding world?

I haven’t been doing the column lately in The Skateboard Mag but I feel lucky to have been able to do that for SO LONG!  Thanks so much to Kevin Wilkins at The Skateboard Mag for making that possible.  I think my style fit(s) into the skateboarding world because I am and always will be a devotee of that community.  Now that I skateboard less often than I’d like to, I feel like maybe I’m growing into an old lady a bit so now maybe it’s time for the new voices to dominate: like your brother’s and yours!  The many hours and days and years I have spent rolling that little sled all over the earth will always define who I am.  It gave me a different kind of awareness about people and landscapes.  I hope to be healthy and able enough to keep skating for years to come.

There is always an overwhelming sense of culture, history and tradition in your paintings. Do you find yourself pulling inspiration from a specific nationality or is it mainly fictional?

I am very much inspired and informed by my own experience growing up in a rural town in California and the temporal cultural specificity woven into that experience.  I often revisit archetypal characters of the places and times I have lived in.  I am also in constant awe of folk art from around the world and the way people from a spectrum of cultures and climates represent their own regional characters, historical figures, and heroes.

Your use of patterns and outfits is very authentic. Is there a time period or fashion style you admire the most? Ever make your own textiles?

Hahaha!  Wow, thank you!  I have never been complimented on authenticity of the outfits I paint and animate before.  I am kind of oblivious when it comes to fashion but I imagine somebody else could probably point out better than I could what time period or fashion style I am tending towards.  I have become increasingly obsessed with cowboy boots and I also enjoy painting clothes with tassels and fringe.  I grew up around a lot of farmers, cowboys and people with monster trucks, motorcycles and muscle cars so I imagine the kind of outfits those folks would strut around in make up a big section of my mental costume department.  I the people in my work usually look very American and occasionally they are donning more Russian or Ukrainian styles.  I have never made my own textiles per se… unless you count knitting?  I am addicted to knitting.  But I have never made any prints for fabrics or anything.  I hope that one day I will get a chance to do that!

Art for your Ears

What better way to consummate a day of relishing in the art at Miami’s Art Basel than going to check out some live music! You can catch  Grizzly Bear’s Chris Taylor and Neon Indian on Friday, December 7 at Bardot for a more intimate musical experience. If you are interested in a more interactive musical performance, you should check out Flying Lotus and Dan Deacon at Grand Central on Saturday, December 8. Known for his live performances, musician and composer Dan Deacon takes audience participation to the next level with the creation of an interactive audience performance app for smart phones. In a recent interview, Deacon  says that “for a while [he has] been thinking of new ways to recontextualize the audience and making them the performers or focal points of the performance”. The Dan Deacon Smartphone App enables Deacon to synchronize light and sound on the phones of audience members based on their various locations in the venue.

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Interview with Ben Brough

Ben Brough is an American painter and collage artist who was born in California and raised in Hawaii. Brough’s spectacular paintings capture the significance of his Pacific upbringing and his affinity for surfer/ skate culture.

The last time we spoke, you were really enthusiastic about your “Ctrl + Alt + Del” concept featured in “The Last of the Outside Enjoyers”. What lead you to explore this idea? What is its significance in relation to Good for Nothing?

When I was a kid growing up we played outside till dinner time. When we “liked” something we were either doing it or about to or trying to. These days kids play outside still but times are different, there is that digital element that stands in the way. You have that option to go outside and like something or stay inside and look at it on a screen. We all know what that button does and the concept behind this particular pieces kids playing outside flying a kite or whatever and the button has been pushed. The act of outside doing is disappearing. 

Surfing has clearly played a huge role in your artwork from the beginning. Is there a surfer whose surfing style you feel is directly related to your artistic style?

Not really someone’s style, but I know I did like all the comics and art in the mags growing up. “Maynard and the Rat” and Bob Penuelas’ "Wilbur Kookmeyer" were a huge influence on me. I was and still am wrapped in surfing and skateboarding cultures. I loved getting surfer and thrasher mags looking at all the artwork on boards and in the articles… I still do. 

I’ve always noticed “33” signed in the bottom right of each of your pieces. What is the history behind the number?

It's my initials “BB”. When I sign my name the B's looked like 3's to me so I thought “33” looked cooler. I've been using it for over 20 years and it has become a very significant number to me, I see it everywhere. I think the number itself holds mystical powers. 

What kind of movies did you grow up on as a kid? Any relationship between the films and the way your style has developed?

I grew up on a lot of movies… Classics from the 80’s and 90’s, comedy, drama, horror. I watched and still watch almost anything, I love cinema. It’s the same as music to me. I’ll watch the same movie over and over like a song. As far as my style, I’m not sure. I’ve always drawn the way I do but I definitely use content from films.



We can’t wait to have Ben Brough’s work on display in “Good for Nothing” at The LAB Miami starting December 7. Make sure to come by and check it out!